Clock of the Year – Vote on your favorite

Dec15_18 Clock of weekScan
Clock drawing by intelligent 71-year old
Every year I publish a series of clock drawings. Some people really like seeing the range of clocks that people draw including the clock above – drawn by a 71-year old right handed woman with confusion. One could argue that she had much of the task drawn correctly until she tried to correctly set the hands as instructed. I like this clock because it illustrates the break down in problem solving of the three steps required for success. Ostensibly, this patients followed the directions as instructed. The numerals were correctly placed and finally she placed hands on the clock. Arguably, by drawing too many hands she may have been exhibiting a perseverative response, decreased self-monitoring and error detection, and a failure in understanding the problem in terms of the correct time – 11:10. In this case she asked “AM or PM” but did realize her error relative her specific drawing. She drew no circle into which the numerals were to have been placed.  The yearly ritual of finding the clock of the year has begun. What fun!
“For many living with a person who has dementia can be an unforgettable challenge that evokes guilt, resentment and despair.” Michael Sefton 2018
The clock above was drawn by a 71-year old female who is in the hospital because of an infection.  When this was drawn her infection had been cleared up.  She is a verbally gifted woman with a full education.  Her family has seen a change in her thinking skills in the past 12 months and now wonders what can be done? Her verbal intelligence is in the 90th percentile with an estimated VIQ of 120.  Verbal abilities often interfere with the assessment process and there comes a time in every assessment when the examiner must put a stop to the fun and frivolity of making acquaintance. 
This year I received a few more drawings from clinicians in the community including the clock of the week from December 10, 2018.  One of the clocks that was published this year was featured on the Australian Broadcasting Company television series “Ask the Doctor“. The clock is featured about 16 minutes into the broadcast. I have been given permission by the ABC to display the link to the broadcast. I will publish several clocks and I ask that readers vote on the most interesting clock.  We will vote for 2 weeks in January.  Happy New Year and have a safe holiday.

 

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Resilience needed after Concussion

Emotional resilience refers to the capacity to rebound after emotionally impactful event or happenstance.  At a meeting of the Sports Neuropsychology Society held in early May each year the topic of “resilience” emerged as a term referring to the physical and emotional response to adverse events. According to Sonia Coelho Mosch, Ph.D., “your body and mind can choose how to respond to the event with ‘I’m really screwed’ or you can change what you say to yourself with the expectation that you are going to overcome it” on Forbes.com.  Patients who obsess over every symptom may be those who go on to experience post-concussion syndrome.
Resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress — such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems or workplace and financial stressors” according to the American Psychological Association.
Dr. Mosch believes people who take responsibility for their injury and focus on intermediate goals for restoring themselves often recover quickly “as long as they do not focus on small symptoms and pathologize every internal feeling state.  She works with NHL pro hockey players as well as clinic patients who are referred for any number of possible injuries causing concussion e.g. car accident.  Positive outcomes are linked to handling the stressful event with positivity and the expectation for a positive outcome. The pro athletes more often than not express a strong willingness to do “whatever is necessary” to get back to work and take responsibility for their recovery. “Resilience is not a trait that people either have or do not have. It involves behaviors, thoughts and actions that can be learned and developed in anyone” according to APA site.
At Whittier Rehabilitation Hospital we are often working with people who have been symptomatic for months or even years.  They come to Whittier not expecting to get better and believing they are truly sick and no one understands what they are going through. When told they must alter their expectations and begin to work towards better management of stress, physical mobility and light exercise, and nutritional health and well-being they sometimes become disenchanted and move on.
In the first meeting, I have had a patient tell me that he believed that he was dying and had started telling his friends as much.  These cases are very difficult to treat and require both physical and emotional support for successful outcome. Cognitive behavioral therapy works best along with both physiologic feedback and EEG neurofeedback for reduced sympathetic arousal – from stress hormones that have gone into overdrive.  A re-exertion plan along with physical therapy, aquatics, and mindfulness are components of a complete plan of action for recovery from concussion.

Wagner, R Neuropsychologist shares pro hockey players’ secrets to resilience. Forbes.com taken April 30, 2018
APA. Road to resilience. http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx Taken 4-30-18.

Preventing Concussion whenever possible

WESTBOROUGH, MA March 20, 2018 I am frequently asked about helmets and those that claim to be protective against concussion.  As of this publication there are no helmets that unequivocally protect against the forces that impact the brain in the course of an athletic contest. The stunning Ted Talk video below reveals details about the protection offered by helmets today.  Concussion is described as occurring in lower brain centers not the surface of the brain as the CDC graphic describes.
“Players are rarely hit by a direct linear force.  They are struck from the side or oblique and the force causes the head to suddenly turn or twist a millisecond prior to the whiplash impact we see on television.”  Sefton, 2018
In fact, there is a newly designed mouth piece that has a built in gyroscope that is capable of measuring g-forces and rotation of the head resulting from head strikes.  Researchers now believe it is the rotational force that sends energy into the skull and brain that causes the greatest cognitive and behavioral changes in the event of a concussion. Players are rarely hit by a direct linear force.  They are struck from the side or oblique and the force causes the head to suddenly turn or twist a millisecond prior to the whiplash impact we see on television.

 

 

 

Link to Dr. Mike Evans Concussion 101 video

Neurofeedback: Entrainment options for recovery from concussion

WESTBOROUGH, MA February 28, 2018 There is a growing consensus among providers that a multidisciplinary approach to concussion management is necessary.  Along with heart rate variability neurofeedback helps to reset the sympathetic-parasympathetic mismatch using proven entrainment techniques such as increasing amplitude of sensory motor rhythm (SMR) that has been shown to quiet the body.  I use both neurofeedback and traditional physiologic biofeedback modalities with all kinds of physical conditions from chronic pain to traumatic brain injury with good results. The sensor is placed at the central z-spot or Cz on the 10-20 EEG placement map. A combination of paced breathing, relaxation, and EEG SMR entrainment help bring the body into a more restful coherence and decrease the body’s physical reactivity that causes tension and a host of lingering physical issues.  The emotional and financial cost of these issues is enormous over time. We use the ProComp + and Thought Technology software in our work.

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A Brief Review and Clinical Application of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback in Sports, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Medicine. Gabriell E. Prinsloo, H.G. Laurie Rauch & Wayne E. Derman  The Physician and Sportsmedicine Vol. 42 , Iss. 2, 2014

The state of knowledge and policy on concussion in Rugby Football Union

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Westborough, MA  August 15, 2017 Just as American’s have begun to understand the true impact of concussion and the risk associated with repeat concussion and other blows to the head, the Rugby Football Union has started to take a serious look at the problem with respect to the long-term consequence of brain injury.  According to the New York Times in April 2014 “a tidal wave of earnings” may confound the rightful medical response to concussion injuries and dominate the return to play decisions on behalf of athletes who are found to have concussion. The remove-from-competition protocol has not taken hold in European rugby where players are routinely returned to play after a 5 minute time out during which they are examined by team medical personnel. Most are back on the pitch within 5 minutes. I have seen college Rugby games where this precise “recovery” was the norm.  The NCAA has protocols for managing concussion but in some club sports these protocols are not followed.
In 2011, Ben Robinson, a 14-year old boy in Northern Ireland, died from second impact syndrome resulting from playing through a concussion. He returned to the game three times after first being injured in a high school rugby match.  Ultimately he died after collapsing on the rugby pitch. Second impact syndrome results from a repeat brain injury resulting in a metabolic “energy crisis” that interferes with brain function including maintaining homeostasis on a cellular level. I  have documented it in several published Word Press Human Behavior posts.
More recently Irish Boxer Mike Towell died from second impact syndrome hours after his fight much the same way as 14-year old Ben Robinson.  He was seriously injured early in the bout and knocked down.  His toughness and tenacity along with unacceptable referee decision making allowed him to return to the fight. “The assumption that rugby had a better handle on concussions than football, however, might have been flawed from the get-go. The most recent injury audit performed by England’s Rugby Football Union (RFU) established that concussions in elite-level professional games were occurring at a rate of 13.4 per 1,000 player hours.” Bandidi, 2016
The NCAA protocol is cited here.  “Medical personnel with training in the diagnosis, treatment and initial management of acute concussion must be “available” at all NCAA varsity practices in the following contact/collision sports: basketball; equestrian; field hockey; football; ice hockey; lacrosse; pole vault; rugby; skiing; soccer; wrestling.” Female athletes are particularly vulnerable to concussion and tend to have longer recover times. Concussion is sometimes considered an invisible injury largely due to the absence of frank signs of injury on the outside of the head.
According to the BBC, Towell was knocked to the mat in the first round of a 10 round bout.  He was given a standing 8 count and continued the fight.  Some said he dominated the next two rounds when finally in the fifth round he was again knocked down and the fight was ended.  Michael Sefton blog 2016

Burns, J. NY Times, In Europe, Echoes of America as Concussions Spur Debate, April 5, 2014. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/06/sports/in-europe-echoes-of-america-as-concussions-spur-debate.html?_r=0  Taken June 13, 2017
Sefton, M. (2016) Second Impact Syndrome. https://concussionassessment.wordpress.com/2016/10/03/second-impact-syndrome-rare-but-often-fatal/ Taken August 7, 2017
Bandidi, P. (2016) Rugby, like NFL, doesnt have the conussion-issue figured out.  http://www.espn.com/espn/story/_/id/16029747/rugby-nfl-concussion-issue-figured-out Taken August 7, 2017
NCAA Concussion Concussion Safety Protocol. Guidelines https://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/2017SSI_ConcussionSafetyProtocolChecklist_20170322.pdf Taken August 8, 2017

The results of postmortem examination of over 100 brains of NFL athletes are in

WESTBOROUGH,MA July 25, 2017 The laboratory at the Boston University School of Medicine has recently completed its initial examination of over 100 brains donated by the family members of those athletes who have died because of marked behavior and personality changes attributed to playing football.  The results confirm the presence of destructive proteins that have come to be known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy.  This was first reported over 10 years ago and was featured in the movie Concussion released in 2015 starring Will Smith as Bennet Omalu, M.D. who first reported on the syndrome.

Clock of the Week June 6

Westborough, MA June 6, 2017 The clock of the week is depicted below.  It was submitted this week by the Speech Language Pathology service at Whittier Rehabilitation Hospital.  I sometimes find it humorous that when I ask a patient to draw a clock they will have already drawn a clock for the speech pathologist. The drawing is used in all aspects of cognitive assessment by pracititioners of all types from neuropsychology to internal medicine to emergency medicine.  I typically begin an assessment with the clock drawing because it is nonthreatening and offers a great deal of interesting information about the cognitive capacity of the patient.  It was drawn by a 93-year old male with congestive heart
 

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Right handed 93-y/o male with probable dementia
failure and Paget’s disease. It is a disease affecting bone that interferes with the body’s normal recycling process, in which new bone tissue gradually replaces old bone tissue. Over time, the disease can cause affected bones to become fragile and misshapen (Mayo Clinic, 2017). In my experience there is no cognitive deficits associated with Paget’s.  This clock is suggestive of what seemed to be a great start – in terms of the initial placement of the numbers although as you can see the numbers 1-6 were drawn on both sides of the circle. This is an unusual finding suggesting decreased problem solving and self-monitoring on behalf of the patient.  The SLP drew the circle for the patient. I would suggest that the patient should be allowed to create his or her own circle as this can provide interesting data as well.  I once had a patient draw and elaborate grandfather clock fit for a castle.  The clock face became secondary and insignificant – for him.  The clock is a regular feature here at Concussion Assessment and Management.  
Anyone can submit a clock for consideration of the clock of the week.  Upload to my email address: msefton@whittierhealth.com – No identifying HIPPA protected information please but a brief overview is always helpful. 

Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pagets-disease-of-bone/home/ovc-20183843 Taken June 6, 2017