Post-Concussion Syndrome: Building Resilience with Biofeedback

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Young woman having peak performance training for cognitive changes from serious TBI taken in 2018.
Westborough, MA  May 20, 2018  Biofeedback has been the subject of my posts for a few years and I am excited to publish this paper on using the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) protocol together with EEG Neurofeedback to reduce the duration and severity of symptoms of post-concussion syndrome (PCS).  “Sometimes vague physical symptoms create an overwhelming emotional response that comes from the lingering resentment patients feel when seeing doctors who seem unable to understand their needs. Sometimes the outward appearance of lingering concussion may appear to be solely a psychiatric condition rather than someone who is recovering from a brain injury. This can leave a patient with feelings of embitterment and confusion.  Some physicians unfairly believe prolonged symptoms may be linked to ongoing litigation.” as posted in a concussion blog by Michael Sefton in 2015.
Biofeedback is not new nor is it still considered a novice, untested treatment.  There are scores of peer reviewed papers on both physiologic and neurofeedback for a variety of clinical syndrome including epilepsy, chronic pain, hypertension, alcoholism, ADHD, and concussion among others. The key for those suffering with the effects of concussion is early referral into treatment rather than referring as a last resort after three years of chronic suffering.  Happily I can report that only a tiny percentage of people who sustain a concussion have symptoms that last greater than 6 months.  Nevertheless, the number of post-concussion sufferers is substantial and all too often are overwhelmed by symptoms months after their injury.  There are a number of reasons why this seems to occur and many of these relate to the response of the body to stress and its associated physical sequelae. The photograph shows a TBI patient working on peak performance training using both EEG neurofeedback and physiologic biofeedback for HRV and paced breathing.  Given the extent of her brain injury, she has done very well and is improving.
“Relaxation and mindfulness have existed for over 60 years bringing together the conscious effort to control bodily systems that were once thought to be automatic and “not correctable.”  Research into chronic stress illustrates how damaging it can be on physical functioning and longevity. Concussion is described as an invisible injury yet it has an undeniable impact on sleep, concentration, and emotional well being.”     Michael Sefton, 2016
One key indicator for how a person recovers from concussion closely relates to their prototypic response to other stressful events in their lives.  According to the American Psychological Association “resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress — such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems or workplace and financial stressors. It means “bouncing back” from difficult experiences.Psychological resilience is required when “knocked down” by a concussion and to bounce back into a fully functioning, integrated person.  Where are all of these people right?  When this fails and symptoms are prolonged for 6 months or more the likelihood of returning to full employment drops precipitously.  Heart rate variability training (HRV) can assist with lowering feelings of pain and tension that make the recovery from concussion more complex. Coupled with this is training to reduce the post-concussive embitterment often described going from doctor to doctor looking for discovery and validation for what has befallen them.
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“Resilience is not a trait that people either have or do not have. It involves behaviors, thoughts and actions that can be learned and developed in anyone.” APA The biofeedback I am offering helps patients reduce autonomic overload while helping build resilience.  When individual goals are attained using biofeedback people see for themselves that they have control and can learn to lower the tension and pain they feel.
Coincident Stress and Trauma
In the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, a 2011 study suggested that pre-incident trauma may confound the recovery from concussion. “Several potentially life-altering stressful events were endorsed by at least 25% of participants as having been experienced prior to injury. The incidence of stressful life events was a significant predictor of all four outcome variables.” I have started taking data from people I see asking about trauma occurring at the same time e.g. loss of job, divorce, major health scare, family trouble.
There needs to be secondary care for the emotional loss and stress associated with PCS to reduce the impact of an abnormal emotional or psychological response to concussion.  Especially when symptoms go on and on.  “Cognitive behavioral therapy works best along with both physiologic feedback and EEG neurofeedback for reduced sympathetic arousal – from stress hormones that have gone into overdrive” from my recent blog post in which I cite Sonia Coelho Mosch, Ph.D.  A re-exertion plan along with physical therapy, aquatics, and mindfulness are components of a complete plan of action for recovery from concussion and reduced feelings of helplessness.
I sometimes see patients who exhibit such embitterment about what they believe they have “lost” they cannot move on.  It is these cases who are involved in litigation and cannot allow themselves to move on with their lives. They become emotionally stuck – reliving their loss and growing bitter about having lingering symptoms whether it is headaches, sensitivity to sound or light, inability to multi-task, or other cognitive change. Education at the time of injury may mitigate the long-term effects of concussion.
Resilience affords the patient greater coping skill and the underlying confidence that they will get better. Patients must take responsibility for their recovery and avoid being overburdened by bitterness and resentment.  Moderate physical activity and physical support is essential following a concussion. Biofeedback can help reduce the autonomic overload that slowly rises when patients feel constant tension, stress, and pain. Certainly, by obtaining greater control over the unbridled fight-flight imbalance athletes and patients alike learn to balance their parasympathetic system with the unappreciated physical and cognitive threat associated with post-concussion syndrome. “Bitterness is a prolonged, resentful feeling of disempowered and devalued victimization. Embitterment, like resentment and hostility, results from the long-term mismanagement of annoyance, irritation, frustration, anger or rage. ” according to Steven Diamond, Ph.D. who publishes on the Psychology Today website.
The APA article says several additional factors are associated with resilience, including:
  • The capacity to make realistic plans and take steps to carry them out.
  • Skills in communication and problem solving.
  • A positive view of yourself and confidence in your strengths and abilities.Skills in communication and problem solving.
  • The capacity to manage strong feelings and impulses.
All of these are factors that people can develop in themselves and lead to improved coping and may reduce the impact of concussion.

APA. Road to Resilience.  http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx. Taken May 12, 2018
Diamond, S. (2009) Anger Disorder (Part Two): Can Bitterness Become a Mental Disorder? Can Bitterness Become a Mental Disorder? PT blog https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/evil-deeds/200906/anger-disorder-part-two-can-bitterness-become-mental-disorder. Taken May 13, 2018

Sefton, M. (2016) Coincident Stress may prolong symptoms of Concussion. https://concussionassessment.wordpress.com/2016/09/26/ Taken May 13, 2018

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Dementia: Clocks gaining interest across the globe

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My mother Ann in 2018, she is 89-years old and loves to read but has been less active in past 12 months. She is holding a book given to her by best-selling author Bruce Coffin. She is quite emotionally resilient and enjoys reading and spending time with her children and grandchildren. She does not have dementia.
WESTBOROUGH, MA March 2, 2018 Dementia is the diagnosis given to individuals who have experienced an insidious decline in their neurocognitive functions.  Practitioners around the world are using the clock instrument to assess cognitive status among a patient population who presents with cognitive or thinking changes who have insidious decline in their thinking capacity for whatever reason. I have published a great deal about the clock and was surprised this week to be contacted by Nicholas Searles a producer for the Australian television show “Ask the Doctors“.  Mr. Searles works for the Austrailian Broadcast Corporation (ABC) wanted to display a clock on the upcoming show that was published on my website as the Clock of the Week in September 2017.  These clocks are quite telling as to the cognitive functioning – including problem solving of the patient asked to construct them.  See the prior publications of the clock of the week and dementia .
“Take care of yourselves, rest as much as you can, read good books, sing loud songs (when you’re alone…would be best) and read a poem now and then”  Ann Sefton, 2015
What is the prominent feature of dementia?  By definition dementia is an insidious decline in cognitive functioning over time this includes attention and memory functioning.  Insidious change often translates into ‘not every member of the family sees the problem at the same time’. Very often, the patient is the last one to notice that anything is wrong with him or her. This raises considerable fear and sometimes conflict among family members. Everyone handles this particular stress differently.  Insidious means that there are subtle but cumulative changes in cognitive functioning among these patients.  This included a mixed bag of problems that include both physical and cognitive changes that are slow to present themselves and are sometimes missed by family and even the primary care physician. Sometimes activities of daily living such as bathing and dressing become the first things noticed by members of a caring family and often the source of great conflict.  Mom or dad just does not want to “clean up” like they used to – bathing and dressing.  Generally they will say “I took a shower this morning” but they may be wearing the same clothes or even undergarments suggesting this may not be the case. Just as frequently, the previously fastidious parent has shown changes in his or her awareness and concern over things that once were carefully controlled.  I had one daughter of a dementia patient say that her mom never offers cookies or coffee when people visit and this was something she had done her entire life for visitors which she noticed a big change in her mom’s social behavior.

As a practitioner, when I begin a new patient exam, I make an effort to hear from members of immediate family as to what they have noticed about their loved one? This can be benign or it can be gut wrenching.  I try to establish rapport and trust.  I do this with empathy and professional concern that may enlist both family and patient in the lengthy process of the examination . Without trust a nervous patient will not be able to participate fully in the examination because of intrusive anxiety over the conflict they may feel about being brought to this office to spend signficant time with someone they do not know.
No easy task, I recently had to bring my mother to the hospital with changes in her cognition that we did not anticipate.  Her photograph is posted above.  My mother is a resilient and positive woman who is curious and smart. She is kind and gentle.  See her comments in the blog I posted a couple years ago called Words to Live by. They are quite kind and endearing.  She lost her husband – our father in 1984 and has not remarried.  My father was only 56 when he died.  My sister alerted me one morning that something was different about our mother.  It was upsetting and I admit not wanting to take a close look at the true problem – maybe dementia. I had to bring her to her primary doctor for a quick exam whom then said she needed to be seen at the local emergency department right away.  Ugh.  I knew what that meant.  Many hours of tests, C-T scans, and labs to rule out a cardiac event or an infection, or a cerebral vascular attack – stroke or something else. The entire event was humbling and I grew to appreciate the emergency physicians who deal with these cases daily.  The physician who took care of my mother was sensitive and thorough. She listened to my mothers fear and apprehension about being in the hospital. Ultimately, mom was discharged home but still has a struggle with initiation and verbal expression that is unclear to us in terms of where it comes from.
None of us expects to grow old – nor do we expect our parents to ever age or become infirm. But they certainly do and of late, I am faced with the anguish of loosing touch with my mother as a result of her change in cognitive status and I am not sure just why.  I am heart-broken when I think about this and she is not diagnosed with dementia.  Her change in thinking and problem solving resulted from an infection she developed that came on gradually. The fact remains though that once vulnerable to altered mental status (AMS) one will need to think about possible treatable causes of changes in cognition before anything else.  In our case, Mom is at risk for confusion and disorientation whenever she is sick with another condition like urinary track infection, bronchitis, even severe seasonal allergy. And this all means that she is at risk of falls and a host of other age-related problems both accidental and medical. These must be avoided to keep her quality of life and independence.

Dementia a growing problem as baby boomers grow old

I was approached by the Australian Broadcasting Company (ABC) in February 2018 who were interested in the clocks I have published over the years. The ABC somehow found my website and wanted my input on the clocks drawn by dementia patients. The ABC in Australia has a program called “Ask the Doctor” that airs weekly. The clock will be presented as part of the overall change in cognitive functioning when patients slowly become demented.  The upcoming program is focused on “Living with Dementia” and will feature a clock that I published offering web site viewers an example of the changes in cognitive functioning when dementia takes hold. I hope to post a link to the program once it is broadcast.
The incidence of dementia is growing dramatically as those individuals born in 1950’s through the mid 1960’s become older.  Because of this the medical establishment will soon be asked to modify the standard of care for this growing number of people in need. The assessment of these patients will  be tenuous due to volume and lack of clinicians trained in working with geriatric cases.  Like never before older American’s and those around the world will begin to show the age-related changes in gait pattern, balance, strength, memory, and problem solving that place them in direct harm for age-related changes in functional capacity.  Some will require the services of a neuropsychologist who are on stand-by to provide assessments of patient memory, attention, and other cognitive functions like problem solving, judgment and reasoning that most of us take for granted. I have published clock drawings of some of these patients when of interest.  Often they may seem sensational or impossible to believe. When you examine clock-after-clock one can see changes in problem solving and motor skill associated with the demands of the task and can make significant assumptions once the clock is scored.  I learned about the clock drawing from Dr. Edith Kaplan in 1984-1986 while a student at Boston City Hospital and V.A. Healthcare in Boston.  More importantly, these same problem solving tasks are likely to interfere with individual functional tasks needed by the patient to safely live his or her life. IADL’s are those functional skills such as cooking, cleaning, and making meals that are both automatic and often overlooked.
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Sample clock drawn by dementia patient – primitive demonstrating no planning or problem solving

 

There are specialists everywhere who are charged with evaluating older patients and determining what is the best course of action for keeping them safe.  Falls are a huge problem for older patients everywhere.  Of 80 patients in our hospital, I would guess 30-40 percent are admitted secondary to mechanical falls.  I will admit my mother has fallen 4 times in 3 years but so far has not bumped her head.  That said, falls are a significant risk factor for dementia because an older brain will not tolerate repeated bumps and does not fully recover from falls. There are many people brought to hospital after a fall because of hip fracture or shoulder fracture who are not fully assessed for concussion or worse traumatic brain injury.  The first question is always “did you lose consciousness?” and more often than not the patient was not rendered unconscious by the fall but may still have bona-fide neurocognitive changes in functioning.

Using the clock as a cognitive assessment tool – Growing interest around the world

The clocks below are those chosen by the producers at the Australian Broadcasting Company for a show called “Ask the Doctor”.  I am told the show may be downloaded in the iTunes library for free or very low-cost.  I will post a link when the show is broadcast so check back here if interested.  You see the clocks below and may ask yourself “what happened here or why is this so hard for some people?” I had one email last year who asked whether the clock had been drawn by a person suffering form blindness as a reason for its idiosyncratic presentation.
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Clocks chosen for discussion on Australian television program focusing on dementia in 2018
No. In fact, those who are blind are often better at these tasks relying on internal conceptualization and approximate visual spatial configuration. I often say if I blindfolded you I would still expect a successful clock drawing.
When patient slowly loses cognitive function as in those afflicted with dementia their appreciation of performance is often lost and the appreciation for the complexity of the task may become minimized e.g. “I am not an artist”. While drawing the clock many do not self-monitor and do not notice the error pattern until it is all done.  Some say “that does not look right..?” while others explain the results because “they are not artists” or the task is too simple for them. The clocks drawn to the left are those that will be discussed in the upcoming Australian Broadcast Company program “Ask the Doctor”

Clock of the week September 1, 2017


Sefton, M. (2015) Words to live by. Blog Post: https://msefton.wordpress.com/2014/12/28/words-to-live-by-trimble/ taken March 2, 2018

Living with Dementia

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Clock drawing of 78-year old male with advanced dementia
WESTBOROUGH, MA February 23, 2018 Dementia is an affliction that slowly robs patients of their capacity to remember new information. Meanwhile their personal history remains readily available to them. That is why so many are able to share stories sometimes over and over. The cost of living with dementia for those so diagnosed is not a singular phenomena.  It effects the entire family and the wider community in which the patient lives. For many living with dementia is a lonely experience with sometimes  overwhelming sadness seeing a loved one slowly transform into child-like dependency.  Caregivers are at high risk for burn out when they care for a loved one day-after-day.  For many living with a person who has dementia can be an unforgettable challenge that often evokes guilt, resentment and despair.
There are many myths associated dementia that are worth pointing out.  First, old age and dementia are not synonymous.  Patients always say to me “what do you expect I am 82 years old” when I first begin the assessment process.  Research according to the APA, has shown in the right environment memory should not fail solely on the basis of age.
Part of this post was first publish nearly 3 years ago in 2015 and remains a timely addition to the literature on dementia, its assessment and impact on quality of life for those involved.  I have made some changes to the post from 2-1-2016 to update it and introduce another post that will be published shortly about dementia.  Pleased stay tuned to this blog and learn all about the affliction of dementia and more on the use of clocks for the assessment of cognitive changes.  I have added a person story that is compelling and has to do with this topic.  Thanks – I hope you like the upcoming posts.

“For many living with a person who has dementia can be an unforgettable challenge that evokes guilt, resentment and despair.” Michael Sefton 2018

The assessment of dementia is often stressful and the diagnosis is difficult to make.  The stress comes from the rare times that psychologist must give “bad news” to families of patients suffering with changes in their mental faculties. Unlike our physician brethren, psychologists rarely  have to give family members bad news or news that reflects a change in life expectancy.  One might expect this as normal from a physician who specializes in cancer or tumor treatment.  But in general, our discipline is not called upon to provide such subjective prognostic diagnoses very often. Dementia is one of those conditions primarily diagnosed by neuropsychological testing that has obvious impact on the life expectancy and the overall quality of life of those afflicted with it.
This clock above was drawn by a 78-year old man who was referred for outpatient neuropsychological assessment to determine the extent of change in dementia from his initial testing 24 months earlier.  You can learn quite a bit from the drawings of people thought to be suffering from dementia.  In this case, the patient was friendly and compliant.  He put forth a good effort and worked with diligence and earnest.  The task is the same for all cases – “draw a clock, put all the numbers on it and set the hands for 11:10.”
This clock effectively demonstrated the decline in the gentleman’s neurocognition.  It was poorly organized.  There was some neglect of the left hemi-space.  He had no self-monitoring or internal executive capacity to guide his construction.  He seemed surprised when I pointed out his work.  The numbers were not correctly placed. The slash marks were meant as minute marks and not number 11.  However, there were repeated numerals and reversals.  No hands were placed.
I learned about cognitive testing while an intern at Boston City Hospital – now B.U. Medical Center in the South End.  I loved my time there.  I wrote a blog about clocks and the utility of the clock drawing about a year ago called “All this from a Clock”.  If interested in the clock drawing take a look at the link I posted.  There is growing from clinicians around the world about dementia and using the clock as a screening tool.  The ABC in Australia recently chose one of the clocks recently published to feature on an upcoming program on dementia it is not clear when the program will be broadcast in Australia but I will post a link to the show once it is ready for broadcast. Stay tuned to http://www.concussionassessment.wordpress.com and Michael Sefton for further details.

CTE and its violent underpining

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Google images – CTE
WESTBOROUGH, MA January 20, 2018 More is becoming known about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or CTE.  It is now able to be diagnosed prior to the death of the patient by identifying unique protein markers in the blood of those who have sustained multiple brain injuries.  Former professional wrestler Chris Benoit was found to have CTE after killing his wife and son before killing himself in 2007. But murder or other violence against others has not typically been associated with CTE until recently.  As recently as summer, 2017, the brain of former N.E. Patriots star Aaron Hernandez was also found to have signs of severe CTE raising the specter of its possible impact on his violent life and eventual death by suicide. I have posted post-mortem photos of his brain first published on the Boston University site in a prior blog on my Concussion site (Sefton, 2017).  See that post by clicking here.  It is now understood that an athlete need not have sustained numerous concussions in his career to be found to have CTE at time of death.  More so, the accumulation of repeated blows to the head – subconcussive force – is being implicated in the etiology of this complex disease process. So contact sports like football, rugby and ice hockey are being closely scrutinized by experts in concussion, athletic training and sports medicine.  Researchers at BU School of Medicine have reported that a protein known as CLL11 may be elevated in the brain and spinal fluid of athletes with a history of brain injury.  It holds some promise of being able to diagnose athletes before death.  This protein leads to elevate Tau protein a known cause of progressive brain damage associated with dementia.
In 2014, The K.C. Star reported that analysis of Belcher’s brain after he’d been exhumed revealed a key signature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, best known as CTE, a degenerative brain disease found to cause dementia, confusion, depression and aggression). “Belcher’s murder-suicide is the worst possible example of domestic violence, and these findings come as the NFL is under attack for its handling of domestic violence.” (Mellinger, 2014 Kansas City Star). 
“CTE has been found to cause erratic and sometimes tragic behavior by some NFL players, perhaps most notably Hall of Fame linebacker Junior Seau, who killed himself last year. The disease, only recently diagnosable before death, has often been found in former and longtime football players.” Mellinger, 2014 K.C. Star
 Riding a bicycle is a leading cause of brain injury in childhood. Recently, CTE has not been diagnosable before death. It has been found over and over in former and longtime football players. Domestic violence behaviors cut across all socioeconomic strata.  They germinate in an environment of secrecy often early in courtship.  During this time abusive spouse slowly isolates his intimate partner from her support – family, friends, finances.  “In doing so there is a subtle but undeniable manipulation of control – usually coupled with threats and intimidation.  There is growing awareness that red flag behaviors precede DV and domestic violence homicide.  Things like pathological jealousy, forced sexual contact, manipulating friendships, detachment from members of immediate family and others are the early signs of domestic violence.” (Sefton, 2012)  Some believe that the most significant pre-incident red flag is whether or not the victim truly believes she is going to be killed by her intimate partner one day and that these victims are at most risk of death.

Sefton, M (2012) Athletes and Celebrities Not Immuned: Kansas City Chief’s player kills wife and self in act of DVH, Blog post December 1, 2014, taken December 28, 2017. 
Sefton, M. (2017). Brain and Behavior: B.U. scientist says Aaron Hernandez had CTE. Blog post, Nov 19, 2017 Taken December 28, 2017
Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs/article2296030.html#storylink=cpy
Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/vahe-gregorian/article187534063.html#storylink=cpy

CTE found in teenage brains by B.U. team

WESTBROUGH, MA January 18, 2018 The scientists studying the damaged brains of older athletes have had the opportunity to study brain damage in athletes who died from other causes.  In 4 such cases, there was evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that was not commensurate with the degree of brain trauma that was observed during their athletic careers according to Felice Freyer of the Boston Globe. This recent study was published in the journal Brain illustrates that the onset of CTE may be closer to onset of brain injury than first thought not much later in life.
“The report, published Thursday in the journal Brain, also provides what Goldstein called “the best evidence to date” supporting the theory that CTE is caused not just by concussions, but rather by any blow to the head, including mild impacts. Instead of diagnosing and responding to concussions, he said, coaches would do better to protect children from all hits to the head.” Felice Freyer – Boston Globe 1-8-18
The possibility of younger athletes developing CTE and the symptoms associated with this progressive disease is quite worrisome especially to parents.  It was always thought that CTE would develop later in life if at all. With the prospects of the disease having a much earlier onset the cost of CTE over a lifetime is incalculable in terms of medical costs and neuropsychological sequelae that may evolve in time. The true impact of this and the consequence for repeated, subclinical blows to the head is only now becoming clear.
Like dementia of the Alzheimer’s type the build up of tau protein underlies the changes associated with CTE. “Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a condition bringing forth progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging in age from 17 to 98 years (mean 59.5 years), including 64 athletes, 21 military veterans (86% of whom were also athletes) and one individual who engaged in self-injurious head banging behavior” according to the journal Brain. McKee, A. et. al. 2017

McKee, A. et. al. (2017) The spectrum of disease in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Brain, Volume 136, Issue 1, 1 January 2013, Pages 43–64, https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/aws307

Biofeedback: Teaching the body to return to a proper homeostasis

WESTBOROUGH, MA  November 8, 2017  There are several types of biofeedback that are useful when recovering from a concussion.  The first may help with the stress response that sometimes goes into overdrive after TBI or concussion. This involves becoming familiar with the fight-flight mechanism and its useful purpose as an early warning system.  Throughout time the autonomic nervous system (ANS) allowed animals and man to be ready whenever threats to personal safety were present. When we are able to out fox the threat then our sympathetic cascade may slowly return to normal as the parasympathetic breaking mechanism exerts its balancing influence.
There is no way to avoid a stressful life it seems.  Some people are better than others at reducing the impact of stress.  Excercise, healthy eating, regular sleep, and mindfulness reduce the impact of the stress and tension we all experience in our lives.   Michael Sefton 2017
The automatic process of sympathetic arousal ramps us up as if to say “bring it on” – activating us to fight or fly the coop.  The problem all too often is an insidious elevation of normal baseline physiological values that create a sympathetic-parasympathetic mismatch. This results from over active adrenergic fibers largely activated by hormones such a cortisol looking the system.  Over time this leads to heart disease, hypertension, and a host of inflammatory diseases and may prolong those needessly.

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Shown here is the HRV biofeedback screen used for paced breathing and coherence training seen here at Whittier Rehabilitation Hospital

The primary goal of all modalities of biofeedback including psychophysiologic and neurofeedback is to restore the body to its “normal” state.  The process promotes mindfulness and paced breathing to gradually lower respiratory drive, reduce heart rate and blood pressure, and enhance other abnormal physiological readings of skin conductance, finger temperature, and electromyography.  It takes practice and understanding of its value. Not everyone has elevations in each these bodily measures. The specifics of abnormal findings are discussed as part of the treatment plan with the doctor or clinician.
There is a well established link between heart rate and the pace of breathing. Autonomic regulation is the role of the brain stem that maintains the diurnal pattern of arousal for wakeful activity and sleep hygiene.  The brain stem regulates heart rate and respiratory drive as well.  These functions are vital to survival and comprise the autonomic nervous system.  The ANS functions as the brain and body’s alarm system signaling the need for fight-flight activation.  When this system is damaged due to traumatic brain injury the recovering subject can have wild swings of autonomic arousal such as elevated heart rate – patients sometimes chug along at 140-160 while autonomic storming.   Paroxysmal changes in blood pressure may pose significant risk, respiratory rate may become tachypnic, patients frequent are febrile and may become excessively sweaty  as a consequence of autonomic dysfunction.
“Autonomic dysfunction must be carefully managed in patients recovering from TBI. This is not conceptually novel although its application to health conditions continues to broaden. Biofeedback may be a useful modality for migraine headaches, anxiety, pain management, concussion, and stress. I have used a combination of physiologic and neurofeedback for patients with failure to thrive, depression, post-concussion syndrome, and severe traumatic brain injury” 2014).  In 2006 I was invited to London, UK to present the findings of a case study with a high school boy who had sustained a severe TBI and was in a minimally conscious state.  The results were remarkable and not entirely the result of the neurofeedback protocol I used with him.  Our team did a good job keeping him moving and gradually he became more functional and regained his independence. It was a fun trip I was able to take with colleague Paul Liquori, MD, medical director at Whittier Rehabilitation Hospital in Bradford.
Relaxation and mindfulness have existed for over 60 years bringing together conscious conscious effort to control bodily system that were once thought to be automatic.  Sefton, 2016

Sefton, M (2014) Blog post: https://concussionassessment.wordpress.com/consultation/topics-in-neuropsychology/tbi/autonomic-dysfunction/ Taken 11-13-17.
Sefton, M (2016) Blog post: https://concussionassessment.wordpress.com/2016/04/01/biofeedback-for-post-concussion-syndrome/ Taken 11-13-17

Clock of the Week

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Dr. Michael Sefton at Boston Museum of Fine Arts
WESTBOROUGH, MA September 15, 2017  Much has been published about the utility of the clock drawing in making preliminary assumptions about the cognitive health of an individual who may be referred for neuropsychological assessment.  I use it all the time and those of you who have submitted clocks for publication here agree with my assumptions.  The photograph at the left was taken at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts by a colleague Dr. David Kent, a neuropsychologist from Worcester, MA. There are several posts that identify some of the literature behind the assumptions I make about clock drawing and cognition.  Here is another link: Clocks and cognition

 

 

Click and see the interesting “Clock of the week